Envision phase of appreciative inquiry

People learn what is working well and use this to help them to consider what practices they would like to see happen more of the time in the future.  Based on what you have found out during the discover phase:

 

Positive caring practices are practices that have been identified as working well, and presented as explicit statements of a desired future.  Staff, residents and families develop these to inform future practice.  The statements have particular characteristics which are that they:

  • Challenge or interrupt the current day to day reality
  • Are grounded in past lived examples
  • Are what everyone really wants
  • Are bold and in the present tense as if it is happening right now

Some examples of positive caring practices from the project and their links to the 7  c’s framework are presented below:

Positive Care Practices
  • We make a point of approaching relatives to update them about how their loved one has been on a regular basis rather than relatives coming to find staff to ask. [Collaborate]
  • We enjoy having a joke and banter with residents when we feel this is appropriate. For example when residents themselves initiate a bit of fun or a joking attitude to something, we respond to this with humour. [Connecting emotionally]
  • We always try to encourage residents to do things for themselves in a gentle way and give positive feedback to indicate progress. [Celebrate]
  • It is important to us that residents eat food in a way that they want to. For example one lady likes to pour her tea onto her toast and scrambled egg before eating it and we make a point of not commenting on this. [Consider other perspectives and celebrate]
  • It is important to us that residents eat food in a way that they want to. For example one lady likes to pour her tea onto her toast and scrambled egg before eating it and we make a point of not commenting on this. [Consider other perspectives and celebrate]
  • We value knowing about the person. For example when introducing new staff to residents we make a point of saying something about them – this is xxxxx and she was an artist. [Celebrate]

 

left alone

Once these positive caring practices have been identified we encourage you to select an image that sums up the statement and map the statement onto the image. These can be displayed on the wall or on a digital photo frame.

They can be used to:

  • Display the vision of the care setting
  • Inform others of the way we do things around here
  • Foster discussion, learning and development

We suggest that they are displayed along with the following questions:

  • How do you feel about the statement?
  • Does this happen most of the time?
  • What helps this to happen?
  • How could this happen more of the time?

Language is an important aspect of appreciative inquiry. It is also an important aspect of the culture of the organisation. The language we use influences attitudes and behaviour. In the project, during the discovery phase of appreciative inquiry we noticed language that worked well and language that seemed to detract from a positive experience. We worked with staff to be attentive to language that was person centred. We were also curious about language that was not person centred. We ‘played’ with this together to transform it into a more person centred and dignified way of communicating.

We developed a language poster that contrasted what we used to say with what we now say.

Mind Your Language

The short video shows staff on the unit debatingand transforming language.

 

 

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Co-create